Friday, February 24, 2006

Perkiness has its place

I wound up going to see the doctor this afternoon. Turns out that Mother Nature gifted me with full-blown bronchitis for my birthday.

*sigh*

Doc wished me, "Happy Birthday" then drove the dagger home by commenting that given my age, instead of just giving me some pills; she was going to give me some pills AND a shot.

Folks, if your medical professional attempts to approach you with a syringe full of something called "Rochephrin" -- shoot them. Immediately.

It was a very large needle. This is because the gelatin-like medicine inside had been mixed with a like amount of novocaine. When asked, the nurse perkily replied that the novocaine was necessary because the injection would hurt too bad without it.

This is what us carefully-trained law enforcement investigative types call, "A Clue".

And, of course, due to the mass amount of ... stuff ... inside the needle, the injection site will not, I say again, will not, be in your arm.

A side note? Perkiness has it's place. That place is not when I'm bent over an exam table with my jeans and unmentionables around my knees.

And the phrase "Okay, big burn" should never, NEVER, be uttered in a perky tone of voice.

Birthdays are really starting to suck.

LawDog

5 comments:

Tam said...

Well, Happy B-day, get well soon, and welcome to the blogosphere. :)

LawDog said...

Thanks, Tam. This could get interesting.

Ian

Anonymous said...

I ignore the numbers associated with my birthdays as I don't hang out with old folks. :) They sure do beat the alternative though. Al in Columbia

Anonymous said...

Catching up on reading some of your old posts. You definitely want Rocephin to be diluted with Lidocaine. It burns like the lowest hell. Even Satan himself won't get near that. God bless you for having to endure that shot! Yes, when I used to practice nursing, I gave that to a few people. :-)

Kiki B.

Joy H. said...

So this is majorly after the post.... You know how that stuff feels when injected? It does interesting things as an IV antibiotic. I oughta know; it was one of four that got pumped into me when I gifted myself with a wicked case of bilateral, whiteout-conditions-chest-x-ray pneumonia in March this year. Between that and the Vancomycin, my poor veins did not like the IV sites for very long. Thank goodness I got switched to Avelox.