Saturday, November 11, 2006

Veterans Day.

Also known as Armistice Day, or Rememberance Day in areas other than the United States.




LawDog

15 comments:

Nathaniel Firethorn said...

I have a little flag that flew in 16 combat missions in Operation Enduring Freedom. I accepted it on condition that I'd wave it on Veteran's Day and other patriotic holidays. So far, I don't think I've failed.

Thanks for the reminder, LD.

- NF

cleanhead said...

Thanks, Veterans, and thanks, LawDog.

martywd said...

Thanks LD, a very powerful tribute to Veterans, everywhere.

Especially considering this video comes from our neighbors to the North.

For details, see here:
http://tinyurl.com/7mgj9

martywd

LawDog said...

Yes, by Terry Kelly.

http://www.terry-kelly.com/introduction.htm

Click on "Pittance of Time" on the sidebar, and you can read the backstory to the song.

HollyB said...

Thanks, LawDog. I really enjoyed that. I'll be going to Hastings tomorrow looking for Terry Kelly.

Larry said...

Thanks Lawdog.
And thanks to all from other places than the USA that stand shoulder to shoulder with us.
"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:"
Henry V, Act 4 Scene 3
Larry P. Card
US Navy (Ret)

Rabbit said...

Thank you.

Regards,
Rabbit.

Flo said...

Thank you very much, LD. For the musically inclined, martywd's site offers a music lead sheet with easy (thank goodness) guitar chords.

Anonymous said...

Thanks, I passed that video on to some other folks.

Zundfolge said...

Nice song. Excellent sentiment for the day.


Jeebus I wish there was some good patriotic music that wasn't Country (or Countrified rock).

Surely there's some freedom loving punk bands out there!

Arketh said...

Well martywd, in a lot of ways to Canada what Rememberance day represents is not just rememberance of the fallen, and those still living, but also the fact their sacrifices truly made Canada a nation of it's own in the eyes of the world. We entered as a mere British Colony, and in the end had a signature of our own on the peace treaty.

Sadly, as with many other observations they're being pushed to the wayside. Unfortantly, I think that's something that is far too common, accross the world.

Anonymous said...

From a Vet to everyone else, thanks for remembering us who no longer actively serve.

About the only person who ever wishes me a Happy Veterans Day is my wife (a bleeding heart liberal), who, after 11 years of marriage, still always remembers.

MadRocketScientist

MarkHB said...

I was passing through Paddington Station as they called for two minutes Silence. I was stood parallel to the Cenotaph for Tommy Atkins (as it's known) as it was called.

I very nearly started screaming, and striking those around me.

I did not.

I would not countenance their ingratitude or lack of dignity with a gravitas-failure of mine own.

But Dog... I was tempted. Oh, I was tempted. crjmus

Cybrludite said...

Glad none of my cow-orkers were here when I watched that. Luckily, I've got about two hours to dry my eyes. Thanks, LawDog.

Bob said...

LD, I'm proud to say I get a call from one of my sons every Veteran's Day. That's better than any birthday or Christmas greeting, I'll tell you. My three sons grew up moving around (23 addresses in 29 years) as part of a military family, so they know what it takes, and I believe they are all the better for it.