Monday, November 08, 2010

Sherlock

By way of Herself, I find my self watching the BBC Masterpiece Mystery series, Sherlock.

It is a retelling of Sir Arthur's classic detective, my very own favourite Sherlock Holmes, albeit from a very modern perspective.

Some folks are not going to like this Holmes, but just like the recent movie involving Robert Downey (jr) and Jude Law, I approve of this Sherlock Holmes. He is much more faithful -- not completely so, but more so than other efforts -- and this pleases me.

The stories are set in the modern era of computers, cell phones and such (nicotine patches!) with Dr Watson being a veteran of the recent on-going unpleasantness in Afghanistan and Iraq.

There are several tongue-in-cheek references to the original stories -- the first episode is titled, "A Study in Pink", and others abound.

The first three episodes are free for a short time on the above-linked web-page, with the last one ending in what is -- for me -- an absolutely infuriatingly nail-biting cliff-hanger.

It doesn't cost you anything to watch the first three, and I think anyone who loves the old stories would be well-served by giving up a bit of time to watching these.

One word of advice to Dr Watson, though: If some critter has outfitted you with a Semtex weskit, and has the monumentally poor judgment to not only get within arm's reach of you, but to allow you to get an arm around his throat ... do go ahead, apply a rear naked choke, and just put him out of everyones misery.

Honestly.

Go forth, watch, enjoy!

LawDog

21 comments:

Bob A said...

Well, I thought Jeremy Brett was the Absolute Last Word on the original Sherlock. Being a grumpy old fart, I don't like my childhood heroes messed with, but I'll grit my teeth and take in a bit of this new guy - but I wouldn't even try if it hadn't been recommended here. I hope you don't let me down, Dog.

Murgy said...

Who ever thought Arthur Dent could make a decent Watson? Guess that's why they call them actors.

Anonymous said...

I had the same comment about Watson: choke hold or knife across neck. The only problem was that he had multiple snipers on him as well as the bomb suit... I would think he would be better off taking the bad guy with him and jumping into the pool. That would have made him a much harder target and diminished the performance of any slugs shot in his direction...

bmagill10 said...

LawDog--I have found that sometimes, you can access BBC's Sherlock Holmes free through Netflix if you are already a member. Just saying...

Anonymous said...

I've seen three episodes of "Sherlock". Other than the Sherlock character looking like a particularly unhealthy space alien and being a totally insufferable ass, it's an OK story.

I much prefer Chief Inspector Morse.

Gerry N.

Chas S. Clifton said...

They're OK but too much like an upscale version of Torchwood -- lots of stylish folks running rapidly up wet streets in lieu of actually explaining the plot.

In the episode you mention: who is the sniper(s)? Where is he? Why does he use a highly visible laser sight instead of a scope? Where did the golem come from? Where did he go? What was Moriarty's connection to the schoolboy swimmer who died in the 1980s? And so on and on.

BGMiller said...

The thing that actually bugged me the most was from early in the first episode. How is it, given that Her Majesty's government has done a keg-stand on the gun control Kool-Aid, that the good doctor has retained his service pistol?

Laughingdog said...

I can't imagine why Vizzini came to mind while watching these.

theboyfromnorfolk said...

@BGMiller
Trust me, that's not one of the unrealistic things going on. Watson's pistol is illegal, but dosn't break my suspension of disbelief in the least. It's more than possible for a ex-serviceman to retain a weapon, if they put their mind to it.

I say this as a current member of her majesties armed forces, and a former resident of Moss side in Manchester, AKA Gunchester.

Anonymous said...

I long for the days of Sir Basil Rathbone & Jeremy Brett!

But, this one is decent enough. He does look like Dr. Who, doesn't he?

Ulises from CA.

kahr40 said...

He was considered for the role of Doctor Who and several of the show runners come from that show. But it's good stuff.

Old NFO said...

ARRGGHHH! You keep doing this to me... I'm leaving tomorrow for another road trip!

Stretch said...

Enjoyed all the episodes but HATE the depiction of Moriarty. Far too manic for a true Napoleon of crime.
Wife has boxed set of Rathbone and I of Brett. We shall enjoy those until the next of the new series.
After all, "This is a three patch problem." demands some respect.

Alan J. said...

I haven’t had the chance to see the series yet; but what struck me as interesting in your review was how even in the modern version Dr. Watson was wounded while serving in Afghanistan. If I remember correctly, Sir A.C. Doyle also said that Watson was wounded while serving in Afghanistan. It’s just one more example of how the more things change, the more they stay the same. Including how many problems are still originating from that part of the world.

Linda said...

I've been enjoying this latest incarnation of Sherlock too. Though I must admit, I rather agree with Gerry N. - I too prefer Inspector Morse.

Anonymous said...

I am with Bob--Jeremy Brett cannot possibly be topped as the consummate Holmes. But I'm willing to give this a shot because I like you.

Katie said...

As a die-hard Doyle fan, I definitely find this newest incarnation of my favorite detective/doctor duo to be more than acceptable. I resisted watching it for a few months at my friend's recommendation, saying, "Bah, modern day? Can't be done to my liking." Besides, I liked the new movie so much...but then I watched the BBC version. And then I watched it again...and again. And am probably going to watch it again. I'm glad to see someone else on this side of the pond has seen it! :)

Allen said...

I'm very much enjoying this new series, butt(|) "A second series of three 90-minute episodes is scheduled to be broadcast in Autumn 2011." is a long time to hold on to the ledge of that cliff-hanger!

that sucks the low hanging teets
(.)(.)

Anonymous said...

So, where are the multiple shooters hiding in the low-ceilinged room? And no one noticed the laser spotting the man waiting for hours in what appeared to be a central city roundabout? Sherlock is too frenetic and Dr. Watson, now that he's thrown away his cane, needs to be more of a warrior - as he was! Oh, "NCIS" had multiple lasers in the latest episode, that couldn't have been where they were! OldeForce

Anonymous said...

Good grief. Try some of this on fur size:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspension_of_disbelief

Anonymous said...

I have to agree with Bob A. Jeremy Brett absolutely NAILED Sir A. C. Doyle's characterization of Holmes that it's hard to see anyone else in that role (especially as Holmes was NOT supposed to be a healthy man, and Brett was dying by the inches during the filming of a good chunk of that series.)

One of the difficulties I have with translating Holmes out of the Victorian Era is that a vast swath of his inductive powers are time-specific. Being able to denote a person's social class, as Holmes is able to do, from subtle clues such as grade of paper and ink, shoe and umbrella manufacture, cigarette brand, and so forth have little applicability in the modern day where laser printed notes, mass-produced roller-ball pens, and department store clothing tend towards the egalitarian rather than be identifying for social or economic class.